Summer Reading

2015-2016 SWAMPSCOTT MIDDLE SCHOOL READING LISTS

GRADE 5
5th Graders will be able to choose any book they want. No list provided.
Summer Reading
(This is for students who will be entering 5th grade)

You may read as many books as you like. Have fun! If the book doesnít grab you right away, select another. We want you to be excited about reading.

Our 5th grade motto is:
Better Readers Make Better Writers.
When you enter 5th grade in September, you will give a brief book talk on your favorite summer selection. Also on the back of this bookmark write the title, author, and genre. Next, choose as many of the following activities to complete your bookmark.

*write a brief summary
*list important words
*describe the setting
*share any character information
*list the authorís purpose
*make personal connections
*rate the book and tell why
*create a detailed illustration

GRADE 6
6th Graders will read Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse.

SUMMER READING:
Incoming sixth graders will be required to read and annotate OUT OF THE DUST by Karen Hesse.
Annotate means to mark with explanatory notes.
Students will annotate in their personal copies of the book or use post-it notes to mark the text for:
* details about setting
* direct characterization (details stated by the author about the protagonist and other characters)
* indirect characterization (details the reader infers from what the characters say, do, and think as well as by what others say or think about them)
* situations, characters, and settings to which the reader can personally relate
* major plot events that drive forward the action of the novel
* conflicts facing the protagonist
* any details that are confusing to the reader

Students must be prepared to discuss their annotations when they return to school.
They will learn how to complete dialectical journals then.

Sincerely,
Mr. Lewis and Mrs. Dalton

GRADE 7
7th Graders must select one of the following:
Toning the Sweep by Angela Johnson
The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi
Solitary Blue by Cynthia Voight
Mockingbird by Katheryn Erskine

GRADE 8
8th Graders: ALL STUDENTS MUST READ The Invisible Thread by Laura Schroff and
their second selection must be one of the following:

Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson
The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa
Necessary Roughness by Marie G. Lee
Daniel Half Human by David Chotjewitz
Bomb by Steve Sheinkin
Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Beals

2015-2016 SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL READING LIST

Annotation Assignment 2015

Swampscott High School Summer Reading 2015

Welcome to summer reading! Students are required to read ONE of the following books in his/her grade and annotate (see annotation assignment). Students should bring copy of his/her book on the first day of school. All English classes will begin with summer reading. These novels have been carefully chosen and are connected to essential questions for each course. Please feel free to email Joanna Ganci, English Department Chair with any questions about summer reading at the following address: ganci@swampscott.k12.ma.us .
At this time, you may not use an e-reader or tablet for summer reading. Our current school policy does not allow for students to have their own electronic devices.

Freshman – Coming of Age and the Evolution of an Identity

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell
Eleanor, 15, is the new girl at school and bullied because she’s overweight and dresses in a flamboyant manner. Park is a half-Korean boy who has lived in Omaha, Nebraska, all his life but still feels like an outsider. This is a story of first love, which very slowly builds from the first day Eleanor sits next to Park on the school bus. First they ignore each other, and then they slowly become friends through their love of comic books and 1980s alternative music. Park is the only good thing in Eleanor’s life. Her home life is a miserable exercise in trying to stay out of her abusive stepfather’s way, and finding new ways to wear the same clothes repeatedly since there is no money for anything extra.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
Late one night, Christopher comes across his neighbor’s poodle, Wellington, impaled on a garden fork. Wellington’s owner finds him cradling her dead dog in his arms, and has him arrested. After spending a night in jail, Christopher resolves–against the objection of his father and neighbors–to discover just who has murdered Wellington. He is encouraged by Siobhan, a social worker at his school, to write a book about his investigations, and the result–quirkily illustrated, with each chapter given its own prime number.

Every Day by David Levithan
Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.
There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.
It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

The Absolutely True Story of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
This novel is a semiautobiographical chronicle of Arnold Spirit, aka Junior, a Spokane Indian from Wellpinit, WA. The bright 14-year-old was born with water on the brain, is regularly the target of bullies, and loves to draw. He says, “I think the world is a series of broken dams and floods, and my cartoons are tiny little lifeboats.” He expects disaster when he transfers from the reservation school to the rich, white school in Reardan, but soon finds himself making friends with both geeky and popular students and
starting on the basketball team. Meeting his old classmates on the court, Junior grapples with questions about what constitutes one’s community, identity, and tribe.

Sophomores – The Self and Society: Man at Conflict

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Remains of the Day comes a devastating new novel of innocence, knowledge, and loss. As children Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy were students at Hailsham, an exclusive boarding school secluded in the English countryside. It was a place of mercurial cliques and mysterious rules where teachers were constantly reminding their charges of how special they were. Now, years later, Kathy is a young woman. Ruth and Tommy have reentered her life. And for the first time she is beginning to look back at their shared past and understand just what it is that makes them special–and how that gift will shape the rest of their time together. Suspenseful, moving, beautifully atmospheric, Never Let Me Go is another classic by the author of The Remains of the Day.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines—puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. But when Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
Prentisstown isn’t like other towns. Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in an overwhelming, never-ending stream of Noise. Just a month away from the birthday that will make him a man, Todd and his dog, Manchee — whose thoughts Todd can hear too, whether he wants to or not — stumble upon an area of complete silence. They find that in a town where privacy is impossible, something terrible has been hidden — a secret so awful that Todd and Manchee must run for their lives.

A Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
In the Republic of Gilead, formerly the United States, far-right Schlafly/Falwell-type ideals have been carried to extremes in the monotheocratic government. The resulting society is a feminist’s nightmare: women are strictly controlled, unable to have jobs or money and assigned to various classes: the chaste, childless Wives; the housekeeping Marthas; and the reproductive Handmaids, who turn their offspring over to the “morally fit” Wives.

Juniors- The American Experience

The Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson
Hayley is the daughter of a veteran, and his PTSD colors every aspect of their lives. After serving his country, Andy is trying to rebuild some stability for himself and his daughter, but each day is a challenge for them both. Hayley lives with the constant threat of her father harming himself or others while also dealing with feelings of abandonment after essentially losing her parental figures. She copes through snark and skepticism but begins to let her guard down when her charming, easygoing classmate, Finn, gives her a much-needed taste of normal teenage life. A relationship with Finn opens the door to the possibility of trusting again, but it’s not easy. Through Hayley’s tenuous search for balance, Anderson explores the complicated nature of perception and memory, and how individuals manage to carry on after experiencing the worst.

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
Oscar is a sweet but disastrously overweight ghetto nerd who—from the New Jersey home he shares with his old world mother and rebellious sister—dreams of becoming the Dominican J.R.R. Tolkien and, most of all, finding love. But Oscar may never get what he wants. Blame the fukú—a curse that has haunted Oscar’s family for generations, following them on their epic journey from Santo Domingo to the USA. Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere—and risk it all—

The House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
A former colonel in the Iranian Air Force yearns to restore his family’s dignity. A recovering alcoholic and addict down on her luck struggles to hold on to the one thing she has left. And her lover, a married cop, is driven to extremes to win her love. In this masterpiece of American realism and Shakespearean consequence, Andre Dubus III’s unforgettable characters—people with ordinary flaws, looking for a small piece of ground to stand on—careen toward inevitable conflict, their tragedy painting a shockingly true picture of the country we live in today.

Bodega Dreams by Ernesto Quinonez
The word is out in Spanish Harlem: Willy Bodega is king. Need college tuition for your daughter? Start-up funds for your fruit stand? Bodega can help. He gives everyone a leg up, in exchange only for loyalty–and a steady income from the drugs he pushes.

Seniors – Comparative Global Experiences: What Gives Our Lives Meaning

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Dia Sijie, Ina Rilke
In this enchanting tale about the magic of reading and the wonder of romantic awakening, two hapless city boys are exiled to a remote mountain village for reeducation during China’s infamous Cultural Revolution. There they meet the daughter of the local tailor and discover a hidden stash of Western classics in Chinese translation. As they flirt with the seamstress and secretly devour these banned works, they find transit from their grim surroundings to worlds they never imagined.

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Amir is the son of a wealthy Kabul merchant, a member of the ruling caste of Pashtuns. Hassan, his servant and constant companion, is a Hazara, a despised and impoverished caste. Their uncommon bond is torn by Amir’s choice to abandon his friend amidst the increasing ethnic, religious, and political tensions of the dying years of the Afghan monarchy, wrenching them far apart. But so strong is the bond between the two boys that Amir journeys back to a distant world, to try to right past wrongs against the only true friend he ever had.

Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat
At the age of twelve, Sophie Caco is sent from her impoverished village of Croix-des-Rosets to New York, to be reunited with a mother she barely remembers. There she discovers secrets that no child should ever know, and a legacy of shame that can be healed only when she returns to Haiti–to the women who first reared her. What ensues is a passionate journey through a landscape charged with the supernatural and scarred by political violence, in a novel that bears witness to the traditions, suffering, and wisdom of an entire people.

Little Bee by Chris Cleave
Little Bee, a young Nigerian refugee, has just been released from the British immigration detention center where she has been held under horrific conditions for the past two years, after narrowly escaping a traumatic fate in her homeland of Nigeria. Alone in a foreign country, without a family member, friend, or pound to call her own, she seeks out the only English person she knows. Sarah is a posh young mother and magazine editor with whom Little Bee shares a dark and tumultuous past.

All synopses courtesy of amazon.com and goodreads.com